Category: Movies

Breathe Trailer

Wednesday, Jul 5, 2017
Breathe Trailer

Andrew Garfield and Claire Foy Star in a Tale of Love and Polio

The trailer for Breathe plays itself at first like a jaunty period romantic comedy — the type of particularly English comedy of manners we’ve all seen before. “I could ask you to dance, and you could say ‘Well, I don’t feel like dancing,'” says a suit-clad Andrew Garfield. “And I could say, ‘Well, maybe some other time.”

“Or I could just not ask,” he tells Claire Foy, doing her best bashful brit in a ballgown. He grabs her by the hand, and off to the dance floor and a subsequent whirlwind romance they go. They even go for a drive in one of those newfangled automobiles, as people in the ’50s loved to do.

Then comes the almost expected beat where her family doesn’t approve of the courtship. Foy’s character father protests that she hardly even knows the man, and she replies, “The thing is, I just know this is it.”

It’s all very expected and familiar, until, of course, we’re all reminded why people who say “Oh, I was born in the wrong time period. I just wish I could live back then” are completely misguided.

That thing, in this case, is polio. Garfield’s character contracts a nasty strain of the then incurable disease and is relegated to spend the rest of his life in a wheelchair, which totally leaves us with a completely different movie than the first 45 seconds of the trailer had set us up for.

The film is actually based on the real life story of Robin Cavendish, a British tea broker who was paralyzed from the neck down at the age of 28 and set out to become both an advocate and example for the disabled. Initially given just three months to live and told he would never leave the hospital again due to his need to be hooked up to a breathing device at all times, Cavendish sought more and pushed for medical advances that would help him live a fuller life. He went on to travel wildly, remained a devoted husband and father, and picked up an Order of the British Empire along the way.

Garfield takes the part fresh off his first Academy Award nomination, and clearly hopes to keep his string of challenging roles going. Foy meanwhile finds herself as a big screen leading lady for only the second time after 2011’s Wreckers, and the first after her breakthrough role as a young Queen Elizabeth in The Crown.

The film will also mark the directorial debut of Andy Serkis, yes the actor best known for his performance captures roles like Gollum in The Lord of the Rings saga (Serkis actually oversaw filming of Jungle Book before directing Breathe, but the former CGI-heavy film won’t be released until next year).

Breathe is scheduled to open the BFI London Film Festival on October 4th, and then hit select theaters later that month.

Source

Claire Foy On Playing the Young Queen Elizabeth, Raising a Newborn, and Having More Fun as a Blonde

Friday, Nov 18, 2016
Claire Foy On Playing the Young Queen Elizabeth, Raising a Newborn, and Having More Fun as a Blonde

By Jason Chen

If you’ve watched even just an episode or two of Netflix’s The Crown, you’ve likely already fallen under its spell — lush sets, elaborate costumes, stunning cinematography (it’s rumored to be one of the most expensive shows ever produced), but what gives the show its pathos is lead actress Claire Foy, who portrays the first days of Queen Elizabeth with a performance that ranges from naïve to steely to circumspect — often all in the same scene.

Yahoo Style: How did the role come your way?

Claire Foy: Just in the classic way, actually. I just auditioned for it. My agent rang me up and asked, “Do you want to go on a meet?” Of course, at the time I didn’t realize I’d be meeting [director] Stephen Daldry, [writer] Peter Morgan, and Andy Harris, the producer. They’re all quite big wigs. That was a bit scary, but it was just a really lovely chat. I had no expectations of getting it or anything, so I think I was really quite relaxed. It was just really lovely. Then I had a second audition, and then found out that I’d got it, which was a real shock. Really exciting.

How familiar were you with the Queen’s early years?

I think everybody in England and around the world is familiar with her because she’s been around for my entire life — our generation has grown up with her there as a prominent figure. But I wasn’t aware of her as a young mother or anything like that. Obviously, I knew everything about Edward the 8th and the abdication of the throne, and the fact she wasn’t destined to be Queen, but that’s what happened. Her life could’ve been very, very different. I didn’t really know anything about the death of her father and how unexpected it was.

How did you find yourself inhabiting that state of mind?

I think Peter’s scripts are amazing and they do all the work for you, really. Also, I think if you’re grieving or you’re in massive amounts of shock, I think you just take every day as it comes. I don’t think as a character she could’ve thought about the magnitude of what was happening to her and the job that she was taking on and how that would change her life. I think she would’ve had a breakdown. She so obviously didn’t, in public anyway.

Would you say that was the most challenging part of the production?

I had a newborn baby, so-

Oh, my gosh. Congratulations.

Thanks very much. That was quite challenging. Amazing but challenging. It was also one of the biggest jobs I’d done, and there was a lot to get right. It wasn’t just about having an emotional connection to it. It was also about getting the physicality and the voice, and all those things that come with a character, so there was a lot of homework to do as well in order to, when you were on set, be able to be relaxed and just play the scene naturally. It took quite a lot of inhabiting to get to the point where you’re comfortable with that.

Did you work with a coach who helped you do those things?

Yes. William Conacher, who’s the best dialect coach in the world because he didn’t ever say to us, “This is how she sounds. You’ve got to do it.” We all found our collective sounds, which I think is really important, but we also found ourselves in the voices. It wasn’t like we were trying to do an impression because otherwise we’re trying to be perfect the entire time. You’re not going to be able to play a scene, so he was just amazing at giving us little ways in and funny little physical things that distract you from your voice and you end up doing it anyway.

Obviously the Queen has been portrayed on film and in theater numerous times already. Did you feel any pressure from that?

No. Those performances matter because they’re amazing, but I tried not to let them affect me. I watched The Queen very early on, mainly just because it’s a really good film, and I could pretend I was doing research, but luckily, the pressure was off in that way because I was playing her younger and there’s not that much footage or accounts of her when she’s at that age. The pressure to be an identical version of her, I didn’t really feel that so much. I didn’t go and see the play. I would’ve loved to but I just think it would’ve terrified me, if I’d have gone to go and watch those two amazing women do it. I would’ve probably not been able to do the job.

That pressure would be too great! Continue reading Claire Foy On Playing the Young Queen Elizabeth, Raising a Newborn, and Having More Fun as a Blonde

Big “The Crown” and “The Lady in the Van” Gallery Update

Saturday, Oct 22, 2016
Big “The Crown” and “The Lady in the Van” Gallery Update

Claire Foy: an actor bringing a subtle talent to majestic roles

Friday, Aug 21, 2015
Claire Foy: an actor bringing a subtle talent to majestic roles

Her steely, understated approach won praise when playing Anne Boleyn in Wolf Hall and now Foy is taking on the role of Queen Elizabeth II in a new drama

Emine Saner

Some castings seem so obvious in retrospect. Pictures released this week show Claire Foy playing Queen Elizabeth II on her wedding day in 1947, and just as you cannot picture the older Elizabeth as anyone other than Helen Mirren, when The Crown, an ambitious 60-part Netflix drama, comes out next year, the younger version will probably be forever linked with Foy.

It is not just in the facial similarities; they both have the same tiny physical stature, but with a steely, slightly terrifying core, a thousand words summed up in a single glance.

She is not, of course, Foy’s first queen. As Anne Boleyn in the BBC’s recent stunning adaptation of Hilary Mantel’s Wolf Hall, Foy had some of the best reviews of her career. Until Wolf Hall, she had been working steadily, but without the hype that many young actors at a similar point in their careers would attract. There was something quieter about her approach. She always seemed happier to be getting interesting roles, rather than boosting her own profile or becoming a ‘star ’. Her private life – she is married to the actor Stephen Campbell Moore and they recently had their first child – was similarly low key, and hardly tabloid fodder.

In interviews, she has said she is not interested in trying to break Hollywood and has never been comfortable being photographed: “I’m too conscious of looking like a dick. That’s the difference between a star and a normal person. I’ve never been someone who walks into a room and people gasp.” She is “not fussed” about exposure: “I’m never going to be a film star and I’m not chasing it. I’m very happy playing interesting parts.” It is an attitude that will work in her favour in the long run, though The Crown will almost certainly catapult her into another level of fame. Continue reading Claire Foy: an actor bringing a subtle talent to majestic roles

Rosewater (2014) – Blu-ray Screencaptures

Friday, Mar 27, 2015
Rosewater (2014) – Blu-ray Screencaptures

Rosewater is based on The New York Times best-selling memoir “Then They Came for Me: A Family’s Story of Love, Captivity, and Survival,” written by Maziar Bahari. The film marks the directorial debut of “The Daily Show” host Jon Stewart, and stars Gael García Bernal. Rosewater follows the Tehran-born Bahari, a broadcast journalist with Canadian citizenship. In June 2009, Bahari returned to Iran to interview Mir-Hossein Mousavi, who was the prime challenger to president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. As Mousavi’s supporters rose up to protest Ahmadinejad’s victory declaration hours before the polls closed, Bahari endured personal risk by sending footage of the street riots to the BBC. Bahari was arrested by police, led by a man identifying himself only as “Rosewater,” who tortured and interrogated him over the next 118 days. With Bahari’s pregnant wife, Paola (Claire Foy), leading an international campaign to have her husband freed, and Western media outlets keeping the story alive, Iranian authorities released Bahari on $300,000 bail and the promise he would act as a spy for the government.

Thanks to Stef for the Blu-ray Screencaptures.

Vampire Academy: Blood Sisters (2014) > DVD Featurette > Deleted Scene > Party Flashback

Tuesday, Feb 10, 2015
Vampire Academy: Blood Sisters (2014) > DVD Featurette > Deleted Scene > Party Flashback

I’ve just updated the gallery with DVD screencaptures from a Deleted Scene from Vampire Academy featuring Claire as Ms Karp.

Claire Foy interview: The ‘Wolf Hall’ star on politics in the Tudor court and Hollywood

Sunday, Jan 11, 2015
Claire Foy interview: The ‘Wolf Hall’ star on politics in the Tudor court and Hollywood

Foy is unforgettable as doomed queen Anne Boleyn in the six-part BBC adaptation, to be broadcast later this month

By Gabriel Tate

Claire Foy has been thinking about babies a lot recently. The reason is plain as soon as the 30-year-old walks into her publicist’s office. She’s unmistakably, gloriously pregnant (her first child with new husband and fellow actor Stephen Campbell Moore), and, with my own new parenthood looming imminently, I can’t help gasping in admiration. We then spend a frankly unprofessional amount of our allotted time sharing assorted hopes and fears before agreeing it might be best for our respective careers if we talked shop.

Foy’s latest role, as Anne Boleyn in the BBC’s Wolf Hall, means this segue isn’t as awkward as it might have been: Boleyn’s fate was determined by her fecundity. As to Anne’s psychology, however, she remains a conundrum. It’s no disservice to Foy, Hilary Mantel, or Peters Straughan and Peter Kosminsky, who have written and directed the six-part adaptation of Mantel’s Booker-winning diptych about the life of Thomas Cromwell (Mark Rylance), to suggest that she’s as unknowable at the end of the BBC’s six-part Wolf Hall as she was at the outset. Continue reading Claire Foy interview: The ‘Wolf Hall’ star on politics in the Tudor court and Hollywood

‘Vampire Academy – Blood Sisters’ Stills

Saturday, Jan 18, 2014
‘Vampire Academy – Blood Sisters’ Stills


Less than a month until ‘Vampire Academy – Blood Sisters‘ featuring Claire Foy in the supporting role of teacher Sonya Karp gets released world wide on February 14. I have not come across much information relating to Claire’s part in this movie among the promotion material. If you do please let us know.